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Details of Dinky 240 Cooper Racing Car

Dinky 240
 John Cruickshank
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 John Cruickshank
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 John Cruickshank
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Chris R
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Chris R
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Sandro Verga
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Sandro Verga
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 John Morris
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 John Morris
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 John Morris
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 John Morris
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240
Dinky 240
 Peter Leach
Dinky 240

The Dinky Cooper Racing Car. In March 1963, the Meccano Magazine announced the introduction of Dinky Toys new series of racing cars. The second in the series, the Cooper-Climax, F1, model 240, went on sale the following month, after the launch of model 242, the F1, Ferrari.

At a 1:43 scale, the 31/4 inch (83mm) long racing car cost 3/11. Finished in powder blue, with white stripes down the nose and with the race number, twenty, the car had suspension, a plastic windscreen and a yellow helmeted driver wearing a white overall. The car’s blue engine-cowl lifts off to reveal the car’s Coventry Climax engine. Although the model was initially made for the UK market, Dinky Toys intended to make the series available in overseas markets throughout the world and the Cooper racing car appeared in French Dinky’s 1966 catalogue as model 240L.

The actual Cooper-Climax T53, F1 car, produced in Surbiton, Surrey, by John Cooper, began a motor racing revolution, which continues through to, today. Designer Owen Maddock introduced the previously unheralded rear-engine racing car. Initially developed for the Indianapolis 500, the car was driven to success by such famous drivers as Roy Salvadori, Bruce McClaren, Jack Brabham and Stirling Moss. Interest in John Cooper’s car was also shown by a young Bernie Ecclestone. In 1958, the 2litre Coventry-Climax engine, mounted in a Cooper chassis was found to be not powerful enough. However, in 1959, when the car returned to the track with the more powerful 2.5 litre engine, Jack Brabham drove the car to success in the US Grand Prix, at Sebring and went on to become the world champion.

Engine manufacturer, Coventry-Climax, producer of Britain’s first forklift truck (Dinky model 401/597) was purchased by Jaguar Cars and subsequently, British Leyland, where it became part of the ill-fated Special Products Division, which the company closed early on in its long decline into oblivion.

A former works Manager at Cooper’s racing company once said, that although the pay was poor, “ you’d never have as much fun anywhere else” – a magnificent epitaph to the firm.

While Dinky introduced the Cooper-Climax, F1, racing car in April 1963, it was French Dinky who finally deleted the model, 240L, in 1970. The original price was 3/11 . It was available in blue finish at 1:43 scale. Released as Dinky 240 in 1963 withdrawn as Dinky 240 in 1970.

Base:

blue painted cast base

Markings:

racing numbers

Model features:

driver, engine detail, opening bonnet

Origin:

Made in England

Packaging:

cardboard box

Vehicle make:

Cooper

Vehicle type:

racing car

Wheels:

shaped spun hubs, tyres with tread

Windows:

windows

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Contributors

Thank you to the following contributors of images and or information for this page.

  • Thanks to Chris R
  • Thanks to John Cruickshank
  • Thanks to John Morris
  • Thanks to Peter Leach
  • Thanks to Sandro Verga